Career Coach

 

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Bill Belichick is one of the greatest coaches of all time, especially for the workplace. Bosses should take these pages from his playbook.

Look for Talent Everywhere

The current Patriots roster not only includes players who fielded different positions in college, but those who played lacrosse, rugby, and other sports. Belichick saw skills or traits in each of them that led him to believe they could succeed elsewhere. The obvious example is Julian Edelman, told throughout college he was too small to be a quarterback. His size and quickness make him ideal for wriggling through tackles on kick returns, and evading coverage as a wide receiver.

The Situation

Quick: what’s the maximum numbers of plays you can run with 34 seconds on the clock and three timeouts? Or, on fourth and 17, down by 10 with two minutes left, should you go for the touchdown or kick a field goal?

The Patriots tend to prevail over their opponents (most famously, Seattle, Atlanta, and Pittsburgh) in such moments because they practice these exact situations. In an office setting, it stuns me how often we fail to practice situational football.

How many salespeople actually conduct dress rehearsals before presentations? Or – instead of the standard interview – have potential new hires submit proposals and undergo scenario tests? Or even A/B test email campaigns? (E.g. for a campaign of 30,000, first send to a subset of 300 recipients, trying out different subject lines to see which version gets read the most. That one? Use it for the other 29,700.)

Coach Early and Often

Pundits were astonished to see Belichick turn his back to the field of play during the Super Bowl so that he could give his players pointers. Most coaches would save such advice for film study –  they don’t have the confidence in their staff to delegate while play goes on. And yet –  in my experience – what separates coaching from instruction is the continuous nature of the former. Moreover, by far, the two best times to coach someone are immediately after the mistake and immediately before the next time they attempt the task. (You wouldn’t train a dog by scolding it three days after it peed on the rug; nor does this time lapse in feedback succeed in the workplace.)

Let It Go

This is my favorite. During Belichick’s tenure, he’s had at least a dozen assistant coaches come and go; some have become his competitors. Only by such “flight risk” can bosses ensure they fully cultivate talent. Opening the door, and encouraging our subordinates to walk through it, demonstrates trust and empowers them to do their best – even if it means seeing good people leave.

 

 

Note: As is evident from the business acumen, I didn’t write this. My friend Ben Poor did. He lives in New York City and is a sharp dressed man. He will beat you at poker.